10 Guiding Principles for Business as Mission

Read this classic blog from our Archives, an excerpt from the Lausanne Occasional Paper on Business as Mission.
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A good business as mission business will, by definition, have many of the characteristics of any well-run business. A kingdom business must be profitable and sustainable just as any other business. Integrity, fairness and excellent customer service are characteristics of any good business, not just a business as mission venture. As such, while important, those characteristics will not by themselves necessarily point people to Christ. A kingdom business begins with the foundation of any good business, but takes its stewardship responsibilities even further.

What follows is a list of principles that should underpin a business as mission business. First we list the basic foundational principles that must exist in any good business. Following that are the principles that distinguish a good business as mission business.

Foundational Business Principles

1.  Strives to be profitable and sustainable in the long term

Profit is an indication that resources are being used wisely. It indicates that the product or service being produced and sold does so at a price that covers the cost of the resources, including the cost of capital. For most businesses, profits are fleeting, and never a sure thing. It is common for businesses to experience periods of low profit, and even negative profit. Thus it is important to take a long-term view of profitability. Occasional windfalls are often what will sustain a company through periods of financial losses. For that reason a well-managed business will use extreme care when considering whether and when to distribute profits. Profit, and its retention, is not necessarily an indication of greed. Read more

30+ BAM Job Opportunities Around the World

Each quarter we post an updated list of BAM Job Opportunities on The BAM Review. Welcome to the August Edition

BAM Company Jobs

General Manager – Gifts/Fashion Company in Southeast Asia

A social enterprise created to disrupt the cycle of poverty is seeking a General Manager.  The company trains women from low-income backgrounds to produce high quality gifts and fashion accessories made from traditional batik fabric. Duties would include setting goals, motivating team members, maintaining professional knowledge and nurturing the team. The qualified candidate would understand managerial duties to increase productivity and performance within the workplace freeing up the CEO to fulfil her responsibilities. 

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Director of Construction Management – Construction Company in South Asia

This construction company is owned and operated by Christians and was established in the 1960s.  It directly employs approximately 35 staff. The Company operates with integrity to bring quality design and construction services to its clients. The Director of Construction Management should have a minimum of 10 years experience in the construction industry, as well as experience in financing projects, tendering, projects and financial management – preferably in the developing world. They would hold a university level engineering qualification (Civil engineering being the most suitable) together with professional registration in some form.  While English is the language of business, Urdu language learning is recommended.

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Head of Veterinary Services – Dairy Company in South Asia

This Goat Dairy Company has leveraged a technologically innovative and scalable model for producing goat milk and related products at commercially significant volumes to meet the demand of an existing and dynamically expanding market.  The farm’s milking operations, processing and packaging is done on-site.  The Company aims to address poverty in the communities in which it operates by creating sustainable income-generating opportunities for the rural poor. The Farm is in a period of rapid growth and recruiting a Head of Veterinary Services. The qualified candidate will hold a DVM or equivalent and be a licensed practitioner in their country of origin.  Experience in developing and implementing herd health protocols, and artificial insemination in small ruminants is helpful.

This Company is also hiring a Farm Manager for this location.

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Food Technology Expert – Food Production in East Asia

This manufacturer of jams, jellies and fruit juices has been in operation for over ten years.  The diversified customer base consists of supermarkets, wholesalers, and schools, as well as corporate clients.  The demand for its products continues to grow, including into international markets. To sustain this growth, land has been purchased and a new factory is under construction.  The company is looking to hire a Food Technology Expert who can both help the owner maximize his new equipment (still to be purchased) and help develop new products.  This would be a full-time position with a local salary. 

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Various Positions – Food Production in South Asia

This company is focused on becoming the top producer of a specialist seafood in Asia. It has built an impressive nursery/hatchery infrastructure and assembled a strong management team with experience in sales and marketing, branding, fish biology and operations management as well as top quality collaborative partnerships. This growing company is seeking:

Finance Manager/CFO with international experience

Project Manager/Operations Manager

Marine Engineer with 2-3 years experience

Power Management Engineer

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General Manager – Climbing Gym in Cambodia

Phnom Climb Community Gym is Cambodia’s only indoor climbing facility. As the General Manager, you have the opportunity to move Phnom Climb towards its vision to create a vibrant and diverse climbing community in Phnom Penh. At Phnom Climb, we pursue a high standard of safety and customer service. This requires constant introduction and follow through with the team to ensure that those standards are implemented. This position is like no other. While you have to oversee our entire operations, you have the opportunity to work with an amazing team of young, aspiring climbers within an international, colorful and growing community. This is your chance to shape this business and bring it to the next level.

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Various Positions – Khalibre, Software Development in Cambodia

Khalibre is a social enterprise delivering eLearning, enterprise business technology solutions and social collaboration globally. If you are experienced in software then drop us a line and let’s talk about how we can work together contact@khalibre.com.

Senior UX/UI Designer: Guided by business objectives, user needs, UX principles, and industry best practices; the Sr. UX/UI Designer designs digital experiences that solve problems for our clients and their users. This role requires a creative, motivated individual who understands the importance of putting the user first. You’ll shepherd design projects from ideation to launch, and be responsible for executing typical design deliverables, such as site maps, user flows, wireframes, visual designs and interactive prototypes.

Senior Solutions Architect (10+ years’ experience):  As a senior solution architect you will have strong experience in enterprise architecture design as well as experience with a broad range of Java technologies, social networking and development techniques.  You are someone who is recognized by your peers as someone who can take complex problems and create solutions that ‘mere mortal’ developers can deliver upon.

Senior Java Developer: As a Senior Java Developer you will have a high level of knowledge and experience with a broad range of Java technologies and techniques and excellent working knowledge in Spring and Hibernate.  You are someone who is recognized by your peers and your supervisor for being a valuable team member and someone who is helpful and supportive of others in the team, as well as being focused on achieving success in your tasks and projects.  

Visit our Careers Page for More Information and to Apply

Various Positions – Web Essentials, Software Development in Cambodia

Passionate about developing software and developing people? We are looking for experienced professionals to join our Cambodia and Switzerland based team. Web Essentials is an innovative, web development agency providing high quality services to international customers. Founded on Open Source and Christian values, we partner with clients to build quality digital experiences while building further capacity and opportunities for young Cambodians. We are pioneering fair trade software development – delivering excellent quality and social impact. We are looking for like-minded people to come onboard our mission. We know you will build life-long friendships and be a part of a rewarding vision to build up people to live out their God-given capacity within a fun and challenging environment.

Chief Technology Officer: Works at the intersection of technology and human development. The role ensures the organization has skilled and competent human resources to deliver quality products to clients and provides leadership in all areas of technology: systems architecture, local development tools, QA processes, coding standards, and product development.  Download PDF
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Four Essentials of a Working Spirituality

by Peter Shaukat

Having hazarded a comment on the global and ecclesiastical context of our time and offered a rough and ready theology of work, I’d like to outline few suggested essentials of a working spirituality with a missional worldview for the professional or business person.

Embrace the Incarnation of Christ

The first essential is to embrace the incarnation of Christ. Specifically, devotionally, prayerfully to remember and internalize the fact that Jesus walks the Holy Land of your country, your marketplace, your professional sphere through you. You are his hands and feet. You are his mind and word. You are a channel of his redemption and restoration. His promise that we would do greater works than he did in Palestine is surely supported by his promise to be with us and evidenced by the work and witness of practicing Christians in every profession, especially in places where it’s still highly unlikely that the majority have ever seen a Christian engineer, teacher, or businessman.  Read more

The Spirituality of Professional Skills and Business

by Peter Shaukat

This short and surely inadequate article on the place of professional and business skills in spirituality and mission is essentially a plea for Christ-followers to demonstrate and proclaim a wholistic gospel and to pursue authentic whole-life discipleship. In many respects, it reflects one element of my own pilgrimage in mission, which might be described as a long pursuit of an answer to the question: “How do we integrate our Christian faith with our vocational talents and training in a life committed to the global mission enterprise of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit?”

My journey thus far is still for me most memorably crystallized when, as a young engineer-in-training experiencing the breakout of Jesus in my personal world, I approached a mission agency leader with the question: “What should I do to serve Christ globally?” The answer I received then was to go to seminary for four years and then come back and see him. His answer may just possibly (but probably quite remotely) have had to do with his perception that perhaps I had certain “ministry gifts” needing development. However, with the passage of more than four decades since that conversation, I am inclined to believe that it had more to do with a pervasive, dichotomous, sacred-secular worldview rooted in Greek Platonic (and Buddhist/Hindu) thought than with the biblical, integrated notions of shalom, holiness, and service. Since then, by God’s grace, through observing the modeling of Christ’s virtues in the lives of hundreds of fellow-travelers, imbibing five decades of studying Scripture on a personal devotional level, embracing divinely appointed circumstances, and following personally chosen pathways on five continents, some progress in answering that question first posed in the 1970s is slowly being made.  Read more

Business and Shalom

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Our goal is to provide the BAM Community with the best content and resources available. This summer, we are highlighting various articles and resources which have stood out in the past 6 months. Below is the “Editor’s Pick” for January to June 2018.

Please enjoy and thanks for following!

by Roxanne Addink de Graaf

Business and Shalom are seldom seen in the same sentence. Shalom is a word more often heard in church than in the marketplace.

However, just coming from a visit with entrepreneurs in Liberia, I’m more convinced than ever of the vital role of business in bringing about true shalom, the shalom God calls us to build here on Earth. Shalom should be a driving force behind the mission of every business, and shalom provides an excellent framework for a wholistic, multiple bottom line kingdom-building business.

The Biblical vision for “shalom” goes beyond our common understanding of peace. As the Christian philosopher Nicholas Wolterstorff writes, “Shalom is the human being dwelling at peace in all his relationships: with God, with self, with fellows, with nature… shalom is not merely the absence of hostility…at its highest it is enjoyment in one’s relationships.” (from Until Justice and Peace Embrace, Wolterstorff, 1983)

Relationships are at the heart of shalom, and the marketplace is a place of relationships. We will not achieve a true vision of shalom if we don’t achieve shalom in business, and as Christians in business, we need to be leading this crusade.

Wolterstorff goes on in his essay to describe shalom as a rich and joyous state of right relationship (justice), delight in service of God, the human community and the creation around us. Shalom is not a peaceful spiritual state where physical needs aren’t met, where people are still hungry, injustices prevail or work is no more. Rather, our right relationship with nature involves work and reward. Wolterstorff reflects that the Biblical shalom includes “shaping the world with our labor and finding fulfilment in doing so,” as well as enjoying the fruit of our labor, celebrating with “a banquet of rich fare for all the people.” (Isaiah 25:6) Read more

6 Ways to Build Trust for Greater Impact

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Our goal is to provide the BAM Community with the best content and resources available. This summer, we are highlighting various articles and resources which have stood out in the past 6 months. Below is the “Staff Pick” for January to June 2018.

Please enjoy and thanks for following!

by Larry Sharp

In early 2016 I picked up a copy of the The Economist, entitled “The World in 2016”. An article on page 90 intrigued me entitled, “A Crisis of Trust” by Richard Eldelman.1 Mr. Edelman maintains that “trust – or, often, the lack of it – is one of the central issues of our time”. He may be right.

The Edelman Trust Barometer has been tracking trust issues for fifteen years, particularly between countries in the categories of government, business, technology, media, and NGOs. Technology is the most trusted sector and government is the least trusted institution worldwide. While trust in business is recovering, trust in CEOs has declined by ten points since 2011.

A recent Maritz poll2 indicates that only seven percent of workers strongly agree that they trust their senior leaders to look out for their best interest. John Blanchard’s research demonstrates that 59% of respondents indicated they had left an organization due to trust issues, citing lack of communication and dishonesty as key contributing factors.3 Clearly everywhere and in every sector, trust is at a tipping point.

All of this got me thinking about missional business startups. Certainly trust is fragile – in all aspects of life, and also in business. It is imperative for clients, customers, employees and team members to trust the owner because it is often easier to mistrust than to trust. What can a business owner do to develop high levels of trust?

The simplest understanding of trust is that it centers in competence and character. If owners and managers are competent in their knowledge, practice, and in getting things done; and they are persons of integrity, reliability and promise, they are probably a person of trust.

Perhaps the following concrete actions will go a long way to building trust in the business environment:

Read more

Foundations: BAM 101

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Our goal is to provide the BAM Community with the best content and resources available. This summer, we are highlighting various articles and resources which have stood out in the past 6 months. Below is the “Most Popular Post” for January to June 2018.

Please enjoy and thanks for following!

by Mike Baer

So what exactly is Business as Mission? In its original intent (I was one of the first to use the term, so I can say this!) it meant that business—my job, my company, my skills—can and should be deliberately connected to what God is doing in the world, i.e. His mission. Nothing more. Nothing less.

What BAM is Not

Over the past 25 years the term Business a Mission and the concept has been adulterated and abused. For some it has come to mean:

  • Ethical Business—simply being honest in a Christian sort of way
  • Business as Visa—setting up fake or quasi-fake businesses in the effort to secure an entry visa for missionary work in a restricted access country
  • Poverty Alleviation—programs to help the poor make a better living
  • Business Justification—making business OK or more valuable to God by somehow doing it overseas (I write as an American)

Read more

Walking through the Wardrobe: Six Keys to the King’s Economy

Excerpt from Practicing the King’s Economy: Honoring Jesus in How We Work, Earn, Spend, Save, and Give.

Rahab was the prostitute living in the walls of Jericho when the Israelite spies showed up… who one day looked out the window and saw another kingdom invading, a kingdom with another king.

A Kingdom within a Kingdom

Today, each one of us is a bit like Rahab. We live in one kingdom, a kingdom of this world. When we look out the window and see King Jesus and his kingdom headed our way, we’re confronted with the same question Rahab faced: Whose side am I on? Nobody can swear ultimate allegiance to more than one king. “No one can serve two masters” (Matt. 6:24).

Actually, our situation is a bit more complicated than Rahab’s. Jesus has already invaded the city. Furthermore, Jesus hasn’t come simply to obliterate the human kingdoms we’ve grown up in; he’s come to conquer and reclaim them. After all, every throne, dominion, ruler, or authority – on earth and in heaven – was created by and for him (see Col. 1:16–18). And at the end of the biblical story, we find the “kings of the earth” bringing their “splendor” into the new heavens and new earth (Rev. 21:24). And most importantly for our purposes in this book, our role isn’t simply to accept the invading King and then abandon the communities in which we live. Our role is to swear allegiance to Jesus and become, as the church, an outpost, a colony of the Jesus kingdom, amidst the kingdoms of the world. We are to declare in our words, our actions, and our lives together that “there is another king” (Acts 17:7), and he’s on his way to reclaim what’s his. Through lives lived under the rule of Jesus, we invite every other kingdom to join us in pledging allegiance to our world’s rightful Lord.  Read more

Practicing Jubilee Through Entrepreneurship

by Stu Minshew

Last week, I shared how Michael Rhodes and Robby Holt’s new book, Practicing the King’s Economy: Honoring Jesus in How We Work, Earn, Spend, Save, and Give, challenges readers to consider ways to provide employment opportunities for those on the margins of society. Throughout the world, we are surrounded by those in need. Many individuals, and even entire groups of people, live on the margins of our society, including racial or ethnic minorities, low-income communities, single moms, the elderly, and those who have served time in jail.

As Christians in business, we are called to provide opportunities for those on the margins to build equity and take part in Christ’s abundant provision for His people.

My last post discussed shifting from a soup kitchen mentality to a potluck mentality, equipping us to more effectively walk alongside those on the margins.

Today, I want to explore another concept from Practicing the King’s Economy, unpacking what the Bible says about equity and the concept of Jubilee. As Christians in business, we are called to provide opportunities for those on the margins to build equity and take part in Christ’s abundant provision for His people. I’ll also discuss specific ways that entrepreneurship can create pathways to equity for those on the margins.

Jubilee and Restoration

To show God’s plan for everyone to have an equity stake in His economy, Rhodes and Holt go to the Book of Exodus. When the Israelites disobey and are sent to wander the desert for forty years, God uses this time, not only to discipline them, but also to show them what His economy should look like. As He provides manna, God shows them that He is a God of abundance and provides enough for everyone. At the same time, those who try to store up more than they need find it rotten and full of maggots the following day.  Read more

A Potluck Approach: Engaging the Marginalized with Meaningful Work

by Stu Minshew

Work is good, and we are called to glorify God through the work that we do, but what does that look like in our day-to-day lives as entrepreneurs and Kingdom businesspeople? A new book by Michael Rhodes and Robby Holt, Practicing the King’s Economy: Honoring Jesus in How We Work, Earn, Spend, Save, and Give, has challenged me to intentionally consider how I can provide employment opportunities for those on the margins of society. Today, I want to share two key takeaways for as we seek to engage those on the margins through our work.

Where Do We Start: Potluck vs. Soup Kitchen

No matter where we live and work, we are surrounded by those in need. Many individuals, and even entire groups of people, live on the margins of our society. There are those who have committed crimes and served time in jail, those treated as inferior because of their race or ethnicity, members of low-income communities, single moms, and the elderly. Almost everywhere in the world, these individuals are afforded less encouragement and fewer opportunities for work, and are often prevented from even pursuing meaningful work.

How should Christians respond? We must start by realizing the value inherent in each individual, a value that comes from the fact that they are created and loved by God. As His followers, we are also called to love them and we demonstrate that love in the way we engage them.  Read more