The Role of Business Leadership Through a Spiritual Lens

by Ross O’Brien

This article picks up where we left off last year in the series on Value Chain Analysis Through a Spiritual Lens. If you have not yet read the previous articles, let me encourage you to read at least the introductory article linked here, as it will set the foundation for this and all the other articles in the series.

As we continue examining the way the value chain analysis can be useful, we need to keep in mind that these activities do not operate in isolation or for their own purposes. The activities in one functional area impact other areas and must be coordinated to help the company achieve its overall strategic objectives.

For example, if a firm takes a differentiation strategy in which its products, services, brand and marketing messages are unique from its competitors, then every functional area must seek to add value to achieving that objective of uniqueness. A company like Apple spends significant money on R&D, quality components and exceptional advertising to set its products apart. Primary activities including inbound logistics (sourcing components), production (quality control processes), and sales and marketing (advertising) must all support this objective, as well as the support activities of procurement (spending the necessary money to ensure differentiation) and human resources management (hiring, training, evaluating and compensating the kind of employees who will maintain the standards of excellence needed).

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Value Chain Analysis Through a Spiritual Lens: Introduction

AND THE AWARD GOES TO...

Our goal is to provide the BAM Community with great content and resources. As we start the new year, we are highlighting articles which have stood out in the past 6 months.

Below is the “Editor’s Pick” for July to December 2018.

Please enjoy and thanks for following!

by Ross O’Brien

In his 1985 book Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Superior Performance, Michael Porter introduced the value chain analysis. Many business people are familiar with Porter’s Five Forces Framework as well as his three generic strategies. The five forces address industry-level issues that to a large degree shape the potential for a return on investment in any given industry. The generic strategies help business leaders select the appropriate strategy for operating within a given industry and market. Both are helpful tools in the strategy toolbox.

Many are not as familiar with the value chain analysis. This tool looks closely at each of the activities involved in a business to examine how each activity can add value to the company as it seeks to execute its strategy. These activities are divided into primary activities and support activities.

Primary activities are those in which employees are “hands on” with the product at any stage in its development or involved with the customer at any stage in the customer’s interaction with the company.

Support activities are those necessary for the business to carry out the primary activities.

It is important to see both primary and secondary activities as a whole system as well as component parts. In doing so, you can understand how a competitive advantage is only possible when the various activities operate in harmony, not in isolation. Below is an image showing each of these activities.

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The Spirituality of Professional Skills and Business

AND THE AWARD GOES TO...

Our goal is to provide the BAM Community with great content and resources. As we start the new year, we are highlighting articles which have stood out in the past 6 months.

Below is the “Most Popular Post” for July to December 2018.

Please enjoy and thanks for following!

by Peter Shaukat

This short and surely inadequate article on the place of professional and business skills in spirituality and mission is essentially a plea for Christ-followers to demonstrate and proclaim a wholistic gospel and to pursue authentic whole-life discipleship. In many respects, it reflects one element of my own pilgrimage in mission, which might be described as a long pursuit of an answer to the question: “How do we integrate our Christian faith with our vocational talents and training in a life committed to the global mission enterprise of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit?”

My journey thus far is still for me most memorably crystallized when, as a young engineer-in-training experiencing the breakout of Jesus in my personal world, I approached a mission agency leader with the question: “What should I do to serve Christ globally?” The answer I received then was to go to seminary for four years and then come back and see him. His answer may just possibly (but probably quite remotely) have had to do with his perception that perhaps I had certain “ministry gifts” needing development. However, with the passage of more than four decades since that conversation, I am inclined to believe that it had more to do with a pervasive, dichotomous, sacred-secular worldview rooted in Greek Platonic (and Buddhist/Hindu) thought than with the biblical, integrated notions of shalom, holiness, and service. Since then, by God’s grace, through observing the modeling of Christ’s virtues in the lives of hundreds of fellow-travelers, imbibing five decades of studying Scripture on a personal devotional level, embracing divinely appointed circumstances, and following personally chosen pathways on five continents, some progress in answering that question first posed in the 1970s is slowly being made.  Read more

Multiplication: Why the BAM Movement Needs You!

by Jo Plummer

December 2018 marks four full years of the new Business as Mission website and the launch of The BAM Review blog and today marks the 100th Edition of The BAM Review email, that has been going out to our subscriber list twice a month since January 2015!

With these milestones to celebrate and the end of another year approaching, I thought I would take some time to reflect on Business as Mission – read Part 1 here

Part 2

Aha Moments

I remember reading an email from a businessman a few years ago in response to a previous suggestion by Mats that the ‘as mission’ in business as mission could eventually be dropped. This person had recently connected with the global BAM community and was newly inspired by the ‘as mission’, and thus he strongly lamented the suggestion that it could be abandoned in the future. ‘Business as mission’ could never, in his view, be condensed back down to mere ‘business’ because for him that meant old ways of thinking about his vocation that had nothing to do with his faith or God’s kingdom work.  Read more

Reflections on Business as Mission: For the 100th Edition of The BAM Review

by Jo Plummer

December 2018 marks four full years of the new Business as Mission website and the launch of The BAM Review blog. We have now been posting one or two BAM blogs weekly for almost 208 weeks, and with the addition of a few posts from our old website catalogue, we have now posted a total of 461 blogs on this site!

In addition, Tuesday 18th December will mark the 100th Edition of The BAM Review email, that has been going out to our subscriber list twice a month since January 2015!

With these milestones to celebrate and the end of another year approaching, I thought I would take some time to reflect on Business as Mission with an additional response to the article by Mats Tunehag ‘Why We Need the Term Business as Mission, But Maybe Not Forever!’ – continuing on from Ross O’Brien’s response of last week.

I will round out this two-part article with the suggestion that the business as mission movement is like the bricks and mortar in a wall – and that we will need more of both in order to grow to full strength in the future.  Read more

Why We Need the Term Business as Mission, But Maybe Not Forever: A Response

by Ross O’Brien

Like Mats Tunehag in his original article Why We Need the Term Business as Mission, But Maybe Not Forever, I hope that one day followers of Jesus whom God has gifted for business will naturally recognize their vocational call to the marketplace as a call to fulfill the missio Dei, the mission of God.

God’s purpose in the world is to redeem all creation from the effects of sin and restore all creation back into right relationship with himself. As followers of Jesus we have the blessed privilege and responsibility of co-working with God in this mission. I agree with much of what Mats say in this article and in general.

However, I question a few points, which reflects some of my own mental pilgrimage on BAM.  Read more

God Uses Business to Bring You Closer to Him

by Dave Kahle

God uses our businesses as devices to nudge us closer to Him and to build the attitudes and practices that enable our next step up the spiritual growth continuum.

It was 2010, and the financial crises which exploded in 2008 was, at last, reaching my business. My clients, B2B sales organizations, were shrinking and a few were going out of business. Investing in developing their sales force – the heart of my business – was nowhere on their agenda.

Whereas we had done fully-subscribed sales seminars around the country for ten years previously, now we canceled 9 of 10 seminars for lack of registrations. Individual speaking engagements had disappeared, and sales of books and videos had shrunk to next to nothing. Our corporate income declined by 80%.

The business that had consumed most of my time and energy for 20 years was disappearing. It was like a big part of me had withered away and was being amputated.

On the day that I canceled the last three seminars for lack of registrations, I realized that we had nothing booked for the future. I was going to have to lay off most of my staff.

I closed the door to my office and burst into tears. The business that had consumed most of my time and energy for 20 years was disappearing. It was like a big part of me had withered away and was being amputated.

“Lord,” I cried, “what do you want from me?”

Over the next few years, the Lord answered that question. Among other things, He wanted me to grow closer to Him and more mature in my spirituality. And I have.

Of course, our understanding of events is always clearer in retrospect. As I looked back on that experience, one of the lessons is this: God uses our businesses as devices to nudge us closer to Him and to build the attitudes and practices that enable our next step up the spiritual growth continuum.

In my case, I grew more humble and more aware of my dependence on Him. My prayer life multiplied, my awareness of grace and God’s involvement in my life expanded dramatically, my empathy for others increased, and I felt directed to spend more of my time and talents into helping other Christian business people grow Biblical businesses.

God uses our businesses as devices to nudge us closer to Him and to build the attitudes and practices that enable our next step up the spiritual growth continuum.

In the years since, as I have interacted with hundreds of Christian business people, I’ve come to understand the power in a business to shape the owners of that business and to corral them into a closer relationship with God.

The downturns and disappointments bring us to our knees in passionate intercession for God’s intervention. Every Christian business person I know feels a tremendous responsibility for the folks who make their living from the business. Not just employees, but vendors, lenders, and customers all get some value from their relationship with the business, and the owners take that responsibility very seriously. They are not just praying for their personal incomes, but for the economic impact on hundreds of other stakeholders.

On the other hand, the economic blessing that comes with profits and success allows us to bless others – whether they be additional employees in a growing business, shareholders reaping the reward for their risks, or other good people shepherding organizations and works that reach needs beyond the scope of our businesses. “What to do with the profits” is a decision that often requires just as much prayer and spiritual guidance.

A Christian-owned business is one of God’s most effective tools for developing His people.

In either case, the ebbs and flows of shepherding a business nudge us to a closer relationship with the Lord, force us to learn new skills, press new attitudes and understandings into us, and grow us into a higher level of spiritual maturity.

This is, of course, how God intended it. The relationship between an owner and his economic household is a well-established Biblical pattern. God blesses or curses the entire household – family, employees, slaves, servants – based on the actions of the head. Abraham was rewarded for his growing faith by an increasing amount of personal wealth and greater role in God’s plan. The two servants in the parable of the bags of gold were rewarded for their wise investments with a larger responsibility and a closer relationship with the master – just like Abraham. On the other hand, the servant who didn’t invest wisely was cast out of the master’s household.

And that makes a Christian-owned business one of God’s most effective tools for developing His people.

 

This article was first published in Dave Kahle’s Practical Wisdom blog here.

Dave KahleDave Kahle has been a Bible teacher, elder, house church leader, short-term missionary and Christian executive roundtable leader. For 30 years, he has been an authority on sales and sales systems, having spoken in 47 states and eleven countries. He has authored 13 books, including The Good Book on Business. Sign up for his weekly messages here.

More from Dave at: www.davekahle.com and www.thebiblicalbusiness.com.

 

Book - Good Book on Business

Have you ever thought your business was meant to be much more than just a means to make money?

Biblical businesses are God’s first choice as the means to bless mankind, build character, and develop faith.  They hold the solution for much of what ails our economy and our culture.

Join Dave Kahle as he explores what the Bible has to say about businesses and your role in leading a kingdom oriented business.  You’ll uncover Biblical truths that you may have never seen before. Your views on business will never be the same.

Find your place in the movement and unlock the full potential of your business. 

Buy The Good Book on Business on Amazon

 

8 Business Failures: What we Learned

by Larry Sharp

‘Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.’ (George Santayana-1905). In a 1948 speech to the House of Commons, Winston Churchill changed the quote slightly when he said (paraphrased), ‘Those who fail to learn from history are condemned to repeat it.’

I was recently cleaning up some physical files, when I ran across a spreadsheet from 2008/09 listing IBEC projects which provided data on the status of the start-up, metrics for success and other interesting information. I found it curious that many of these businesses we worked with in the first two years of our existence have “failed”.

It reminded me of a conference in Arizona a few years ago, when after I had cited many success stories, a person in the audience asked me, “don’t you guys have any failures?”

Now I would be the first to recognize that “failures” are not really failures, but more accurately experiments in learning. In the famous words of Thomas Edison, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” And so it may be with those early years in IBEC.

There is no perfect assessment of a cause-effect relationship, and I acknowledge that my perspective is personal and anecdotal, however I believe those closest to these situations would concur that what I relate here is at least at least one primary reason for the demise. Here is an effort to “remember the past” with a view to giving reasons for the demise of each dream and a statement of what we learned. I will not provide specific identification of the geographical area nor the persons involved out of respect for security issues and the fact that I do not want to disparage the efforts of anyone.  Read more

40+ BAM Job Opportunities Around the World

Each quarter we post an updated list of BAM Job Opportunities on The BAM Review. Welcome to the November Edition

BAM Company Jobs

 

Consulting Manager – Karisimbi Business Partners in Rwanda

Karisimbi Business Partners (KBP) is a socially motivated management consulting and investment services firm focused on mid-market enterprise development. Delivering solutions for the challenges facing companies in Rwanda and the surrounding region, KBP works directly with promising ventures to ensure business strategy, management and resources are aligned for company growth and success. We are seeking a Consulting Manager to join our growing team of local and expatriate consultants who can provide leadership across project delivery, business development, staff management, and company operations. Download PDF | Visit Company Website

Managing Director – Acacia Accounting in Rwanda

Acacia Accounting Associates Ltd. Is seeing an intelligent, motivated entrepreneurial and CPA certified Managing Director (MD) for full-time employment. The successful candidate will report to the Board of Directors of Acacia Accounting and will be accountable to the board for the overall performance of the firm. In this position, the MD will be responsible for day-to-day operations of the firm, cash flow management, people management, client relations and business development, as well as manage monthly tax filings and bookkeeping for 1-2 portfolio of clients. He/She will be responsible for promoting the vision and mission of Acacia Accounting through the continuous delivery of high quality accounting services. Download PDF

General Manager – Masaka Creamery Limited in Rwanda

Masaka Creamery is seeking a capable and entrepreneurial General Manager to lead the next phase of business development for this c. $1 million revenue business with over 30 employees as the American Founder/CEO transitions out of day-to-day operations. The ideal candidate will bring relevant business leadership experience including previous PnL-level responsibility, preferably in a developing world context, and must commit to remain in the role for a minimum of three years. This person will be responsible for implementing the company’s business plan under the oversight of the Board of Directors and transitioning the entity from a founder-led startup to an enduring growth business with appropriate policies and processes. Download PDF

Various Positions – Woodwork Manufacturing in East Asia

A small luxury woodwork manufacturer with 30 years experience (10+ in E Asia) Company is developing their small factory into a tight Lean system that will be duplicated exactly with small factories in other markets in Muslim areas of East and Central Asia. The company produces in Asia and sells in Asia using American hardwoods. Open positions include: Operations ManagerManufacturing Engineer, a 3D CAD / CAM / CNC Operator, and tailor made Internships for 2 months to 2 years. Contact Email

 

Positions in Multiple Companies – Transformational SME

Transformational SME is a global community that assists Christian-owned and managed small-to-medium size enterprises (SMEs) to grow in size, profitability and wholistic impact across North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Transformational SME helps companies to identify, recruit, deploy and support entrepreneurs, managers and other professionals for strategic roles. Whether your strength is business management, people development or you have a passion for maximizing business and manufacturing processes, business as mission has something for you!  Most companies have need for competent people with business skills to manage growth and impact. Using your transferable skills and passionate spirit for the Kingdom of God, you can contribute to the wholistic impact of an existing BAM company across North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. For an exploratory conversation contact: TransformationalSME@gmail.com

Operations Director – Manufacturing Company in South Asia 

This opportunity as Operations Director will position you at the heart of a leading missional business for a life-transformation role. The Company exists to bless its local community and currently employs 150 people in secure, upskilling jobs. As Operations Director you will be responsible for lead and developing the operations team with a focus on strengthening the national leadership. Responsibilities include oversight of the manufacturing unit to ensure production and quality targets, as well as implementation of a system of continuous improvement to drive quality standards and achieve operational efficiencies while ensure the factory is a safe and healthy place to work. The qualified candidate will have 10+ years work experience in a manufacturing environment and be commercially minded with strong analytical skills. This position offers a good local salary plus benefits. This Company is also seeking a Finance Director Read more

Still Hot? The Hottest Issues in Business as Mission Revisited

Six years ago, as part of the work of the BAM Think Tank and the lead in to the 2013 BAM Global Congress, we surveyed 200 people engaged with business as mission in some way and asked them the question: ‘What is the hottest topic in the BAM movement today?’ Or in other words, what is the one question they would most like to see answered in business as mission?

The wide variety of responses were grouped into major themes to give a broad overview of some of the most important issues in the business as mission movement.

As we announce the dates for the next BAM Global Congress in 2020, we thought it would be worth revisiting this list. We have grown much as a movement since the last BAM Congress 5 1/2 years ago, though undoubtedly there is still work to do in all of these areas.

Here are the Top 10 ‘hottest topics’ from our 2012 Survey, in reverse order:

10. How do we mobilise more business people? How will business people embrace their calling and get involved?

9. How do we practice biblical, ethical business in the face of the face of hostile realities in the world? How do we maintain our values in the face of corruption and greed? Read more